Friday, 22 March 2013

Dirt Box


As M&C readers will already be aware, upon it's cinema release Night After Night After Night received unprecedented media attention, with glowing reviews coming from audiences and critics alike. It also generated a range of merchandise -one of the first films to do so- and cereal giants Kellogg's were quick to capitalize on this latest marketing trend.

The new cereals: "Porn Flakes" were initially sold in the cinema foyer during film screenings (in a bowl with milk and a spoon), but proved so popular that boxes became widely available in shops throughout the British Isles. The firm's managing director, Kenny Kellogg, even appeared on several TV magazine shows to promote his new cereal, claiming that eating a box a day, and going to the cinema to watch the film on a weekly basis would help most families maintain a balanced lifestyle.

Due to the massive popularity of the film, a huge number of units were sold, enabling Kellogg's to open their famous wheat-condensing factory in Garstang, establishing the company as the household name we depend upon to this day.

Collectors may be interested to know that boxes are still pretty easy to come by, and I was able to obtain the one pictured for less than £5 in an online 'auction'.

3 comments:

  1. I can't imagine any cereal company today ever doing this and being associated with such a movie.

    Ah the care-free 60's.

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  2. I recall that a couple of years later, a major supermarket launched an own-brand 'Come Play With Me' version to cash-in on Kellogg's success.

    Only last week, a 'Cardew Robinson edition' box of Tesco's Honey Smut Corn Shavings went for 76p on Ebay.

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  3. People reckon that the smoking ban made us all turn PC. I think it was more to do with the law being passed on having to wear seat belts. The government managed to choke a lot of creativity out of people this way. When you see somebody not wearing a seat belt, I reckon they go home a draw really nice colourful pictures.

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