Wednesday, 3 August 2011

Icons of Smut: Pamela Green


Pamela Green was studying art at St Martin’s College when she started to supplement her meagre grant with some life modelling. Realising that she had the sort of physical attributes that people wanted to capture for posterity she signed up with some photographic agencies, a well-paid sideline which quickly became her career.

Pamela had an artist’s view of nudity, appreciating the aesthetic and utterly rejecting the idea that it was immoral or unnatural. Her lack of inhibitions were perfect as an antidote to the repressed British society of the fifties and early sixties, and she became an almost iconic figure (in all senses of the word), the most recognised glamour model of the day.


Pamela strikes a pose. The paintings are her own. 

Her success was based on three factors: she was a fantastic looking woman; her photos were artful and erotic and, from the start, Pamela carefully managed her own exploitation. This ranged from controlling the distribution of her pictures to starting the first ever top shelf UK magazine (‘Kamera’) to her appearances in self-produced risqué short films and pseudo-documentary features. She even appeared in a couple of mainstream films, most notably Michael Powell’s brilliant but ruinous ‘Peeping Tom’ (1960), but her photographic naturalness did not extend to her acting so she stuck to cameos.

Still modelling into her late forties, and a talented amateur painter all her life, Pamela remained a formidable, fine figure of a woman up until her death in 2010 at the age of 81.

Brandy obviously is a preservative. 


1 comment:

  1. If you want to find out more about Pamela Green and George Harrison Marks check out her blog.
    www.pamela-green.com

    ReplyDelete